7 Search Results for Tag: Stevie Wonder

All Power to The People

The maddening, frustrating and inspiring experience that is humanity, and our daily struggle as we move forward… – featuring artists like The Stylistics • Flobots • R.E.M. • Mavis Staples • World Party • tulengua • Paolo Nutini • The Jam

Transitions Vol. 1

sail a sea of sound where the only rule is “if it flows it goes” with Andrew & Matt – featuring artists like The Beatles • Enter Shikari • Alt-J • Band of Skulls • R.E.M. • Tame Impala • Stevie Wonder • Carpenter Brut

Tracks to Take you to Europe

Be Inspired to make the journey as others have been inspired before you – featuring artists like Fortheringay • Orbital • The Stranglers • The Beautiful South • The Tallest Man on Earth • Yo La Tengo • Beirut • Soccer Mommy • Them Crooked Vultures • Dua Lipa

Stay — Where to Start With Jodeci • a playlist by musicto

Every artist starts making music because they hear someone’s music that they enjoy, to the point they want to make it themselves. Jodeci was that group for me. Since the first time I saw them on TV as a child, I knew they were the coolest. The first member that I became enamored with was Devante Swing, A tall light-skinned pretty boy, with a high top fade, and dark sunglasses that gave him an edge that stood out to me as a youth. I would later come to find out that he wrote and produced every Jodeci record, until their sophomore album, Diary of A Mad Band. 

Living for the City – Stevie Wonder

Inspired in part by the fatal shooting in New York of a ten-year-old black boy by a white plain-clothes policeman, the audacious centrepiece of Stevie Wonder’s experimental 1973 album was a seven-and-a-half-minute meditation on the brutality of black America: Living for the City

Living for the City - Stevie Wonder - from the album Innervisions

My Cherie Amour – Stevie Wonder

Stevie Wonder’s “My Cherie Amour” was released in 1969, so not quite the 70s, but on the cusp of it.  Co-written with Sylvia Moy and Henry Cosby, it has more of a 70s sound than 60s. It veers away from his R&B popish Motown sound and has more of a straight R&B sound, sans harmonica.

Higher Ground – Stevie Wonder

Stevie can’t be out of this. If you were born in the 90’s, you would know this song from the guys before in the playlist who did a blasting cover that actually sounds like Stevie’s live performance at The Beat Club in 1974 during his european tour.