Matt Jenko

Matt Jenko
Hi my name is Matt, but my friends call me Matt. I’m on the wrong side of 29 (damn I hate it every time I have to update that number), definitely feeling my age, but never felt happier and more content than I do at this point in my life. I’ve been through some rocky patches (who hasn’t) and lived to tell the tale, and boy do I gots some stories. When I’m not giving opinions absolutely nobody asked for, I’m doing a worldbuilding with my passion project, vivaellipsis. If you like offbeat nonsense delivered through immersive escapism, then go and get involved. Or don’t, I’m not telling you what to do. I’m not yer boss. I’m a simple man with simple interests. I like Yorkshire tea, the sound of rain on the window, and a bloody good story.

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Music to Escape Reality

Stand By Me – Medii, Kristen Olsson

25 September 2018

For me, a winning song is one that combines atmosphere and power to deliver the listener to an entirely new world. One that energises them, motivates them, and refreshes them. A song so moving that when they return to earth, they do so with a wholly new perspective that puts them in the right frame of mind to Save the World!

'Stand By Me' is exactly that kind of song. Airy and expansive, it starts slowly before melting into a swirling arpeggio that pushes you headfirst into the drop. And fuck me, what a drop! Exploding like a supernova into a super-slick groove laced with ethereal vocal chops, it's easy to feel as though you're soaring through the cosmos. 

Lyrically, 'Stand By Me' paints a very real picture of vulnerability, honesty, and the inescapable fact that when it comes down to it, nobody is flawless and everybody makes mistakes. We all need a centre of gravity to keep us from floating away, and this track is a raw and open celebration of this unifying force of human experience, expressed perfectly by Kristen Olsson's otherworldly vocal delivery. Not to mention the DIRTY guitar solo!      

Embrace the fact that we can't get it right all the time, and remind yourself that it's okay to be a little bit broken and a little bit reckless. It's the flawed characters amongst us that make the best superheroes! 


   

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If you find my work valuable, or you just really like my taste in music, then you can pay what you feel to support me on this journey. That's really all there is to it! Your support means I can focus more energy in this space, and continue the psychodynamic odyssey. All support is appreciated equally & emphatically


About the curator - Matt Jenko

Hi my name is Matt, but my friends call me Matt. I’m on the wrong side of 29 (damn I hate it every time I have to update that number), definitely feeling my age, but never felt happier and more content than I do at this point in my life. I’ve been through some rocky patches (who hasn’t) and lived to tell the tale, and boy do I gots some stories.

When I’m not giving opinions absolutely nobody asked for, I’m doing a worldbuilding with my passion project, vivaellipsis. If you like offbeat nonsense delivered through immersive escapism, then go and get involved. Or don’t, I’m not telling you what to do. I’m not yer boss.

I’m a simple man with simple interests. I like Yorkshire tea, the sound of rain on the window, and a bloody good story.


Loyal – ODESZA

17 September 2018

Music to Save The World
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Remember when I said this playlist was about providing a superhero soundtrack to your everyday routine? This week I'm laying it on thick with ODESZA's new-but-not-really release 'Loyal' - brace yourself as military snare rolls, mysterious arpeggios and a FILTHY brass section collide to weave a cinematic soundscape that just screams EPIC. 

There isn't much more to say about Loyal really - it's one you just have to experience for yourself. It's your quintessential 'final boss battle/ultimate showdown' theme, which makes it perfect listening to get you all fired up before a big confrontation. Maybe your partner left the bins out even though you TOLD them before you left for work to bring them in, or your boss rather ominously requested a meeting with you in the morning as you were leaving work the previous evening. Whatever it is, Loyal will put you in a conqueror's mindset, equipping you with the mental artillery required to take on your opponents and (probably) WIN. 

To the best of my knowledge, Hans Zimmer hasn't written much for the trap genre, but if he did, it would sound like this. What I love about ODESZA is no matter what style they turn their attention to, they do it in such a creative and unique way that makes whatever track they're writing stand out from its contemporaries, whilst still 'loyally' (do you get it, because the song is called Loyal - that's amusing isn't it) carrying their signature sound.  

Arm your playlist with 'Loyal', and feel its energy course out through your speakers and into your eardrums. If this track doesn't galvanise you, there isn't much on this playlist that will!


Himalaya by Ellipsis

The Music to Save The World playlist is sponsored this month by Himalaya from Ellipsis.

The journey begins - fresh Chillstep from Ellipsis to help you focus. Stream it now:


Follow us on social:

You can learn more about ODESZA here:


About the curator - Matt Jenko

Matt Jenko is a university postgraduate and music producer with an unhealthy obsession with Rick & Morty and all things Game of Thrones. When he’s not in the studio (a rare occurrence these days), he’s fueling his passion for music either on the net or out in the real world. He likes being out in the nature (in the least strenuous capacity though, let’s be real here) and chilling with his cat, and he’s also pretty proud of his mammoth collection of books that he’s never read.

Checkout Matt's project Ellipsis on Spotify and Facebook

Waiting – Extended Mix – Oliver Heldens, Throttle

11 September 2018

Music to Save The World
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'By the time you hear the next pop, the funk shall be within you...'

This iconic line from Kendrick's 'King Kunta' is the perfect way to introduce this week's featured track, the incredibly funky extended mix of 'Waiting' by Oliver Heldens. It's surprising that he hasn't made his way onto this list sooner, given that he's one of my favourite producers of all time, but it's nice to save the gems for times like this.

This track has been the cornerstone of my commute home for the past year, energising me through traffic jams, galvanising me when some WANKER cuts me up on a roundabout, and generally making me feel as though it's alright if every other person on the road drives like shit as long as I have tunes like this to get me home. It's definite driving music - supercharged, bass-heavy and melodic, and you constantly find yourself tweaking that volume dial just a little more to squeeze every drop of power out it.

I like music with a story. But I also like music that makes me feel good. And when I'm soaring down the motorway (safely within the speed limit, obviously) with this song blasting, I feel on top of the world. This can mean the difference between a good day and an awful day - it sets you up on a positive trajectory, like a hearty breakfast or an invigorating shower.

Make 'Waiting' a staple of your daily routine, and see if it doesn't make you feel just that bit better about the less savoury things you have to deal with in your life.


Himalaya by Ellipsis

The Music to Save The World playlist is sponsored this month by Himalaya from Ellipsis.

The journey begins - fresh Chillstep from Ellipsis to help you focus. Stream it now:


Follow us on social:

You can learn more about Oliver Heldens here:

You can learn more about Throttle here:


About the curator - Matt Jenko

Matt Jenko is a university postgraduate and music producer with an unhealthy obsession with Rick & Morty and all things Game of Thrones. When he’s not in the studio (a rare occurrence these days), he’s fueling his passion for music either on the net or out in the real world. He likes being out in the nature (in the least strenuous capacity though, let’s be real here) and chilling with his cat, and he’s also pretty proud of his mammoth collection of books that he’s never read.

Checkout Matt's project Ellipsis on Spotify and Facebook

Putting the Heart Back into Music – An Interview with Frank Iengo

7 September 2018

When ‘Blackout’ first landed in my inbox, I was absolutely taken aback by its sheer atmospheric depth, sonic unpredictability and masterful production quality. There was no doubt that I needed to meet the mind behind the music, Pynk64 – aka Frank Iengo. Frank has been active in the music industry for almost two decades, and in that time his musical dealings have spanned house, chillout, pop, hip hop, R&B, soundtracks and movie scores and, in his own words, ‘anything else that inspires me’. Frank has been involved in numerous projects during his artistic tenure, including Surfers, Aguadulce, Nevrotype, Dynamicode, Relaxingvibe, and of course, Pynk64.

With such an extensive catalogue of works, it was a struggle to avoid going off topic, but we managed to keep the focus on the track at hand – Blackout, which you can listen to here:

 
 

MATT - First of all, tell us about yourself: where are you from, how long have you been a musician, what were your early influences?

FRANK - I was born in Naples, Italy, and I lived there until I moved to the United States.

About my relationship with music, I can say that I was taken with music as early as five or six years of age, for the simple fact that I remember very clearly that when I used to listen to music it had a great emotional impact on me.

I’ll never forget that when I heard the organ for the first time (in 70s it was used a lot), I cried and I asked my father to have it but it never happened because at the time it was too expensive. Only at the age of ten, after many, many requests for the organ, I changed direction and got a cheap classic guitar, and finally I started to learn my main instrument.

My major musical influences started when I began to listen to soundtracks by very popular Italian film composers such as Ennio Morricone and Nino Rota, amongst others. Around thirteen/fourteen years of age I started to play the piano and I fell in love with jazz music, listening to all the great musicians such as Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Bill Evans, George Benson, and Pat Metheny.

After a few years, I discovered the disco sound of great groups such as Earth Wind & Fire, KC & Sunshine Band, Kool & Gang, and Chic. I was later enthralled by hip hop, chillout, dance (with all the different categories - underground, house, trance, techno, minimal), trap, and pop music.

MATT - It’s refreshing to see someone so interested in wildly different genres, and who has a genuine love good music irrespective of what category if falls under. Regardless of whether they share this level of appreciation, most artists tend to stick to a particular sound, and so I'm interested to hear why you chose to buck the trend and instead work in multiple genres, as this is something I do myself with my own work. What made you decide to split this work across different projects?

FRANK - I didn’t choose to do different genres of music. It wasn’t a conscious decision - it simply happened, as a consequence of my musical experiences leading me to explore different kinds of music.

MATT - Do you think it's difficult for an artist to work in multiple genres without alienating their audience, and do you think that streaming will change that as people opt for more behaviour-based listening over straight genre boundaries?

FRANK - This is a very interesting question. My thoughts are that it could be a significant problem for most of the people that are used to associating an artist to a particular genre of music. So, my answer is yes, it could be alienating for some people but I really hope that the new way to listen to music through streaming (whether it be music videos or simply music) will change this mentality.

Music is music!

Music should be something that makes you feel good or even bad, if that music reminds you of something unpleasant. When I say something unpleasant it could be anything; a love relationship gone wrong, loss of a loved one, etc.

MATT - Moving on to the question of the music industry, the way artists 'make it' in 2018 is very different from the way it was as early as ten years ago. How do you think this has improved an artist's chances of gaining exposure and a real fanbase, and what's your view on the demise of the 'international superstar'?

By this, I mean as audiences become more accessible to independent artists, are we going to see more stratified fanbases and more artists having less overall fame, but more dedicated followings?

FRANK - I think that today there are infinite possibilities to have great exposure but of course, it is not simple at all. It seems that you can enjoy success doing some posts on Facebook, Twitter and all the social networks we have access to but you have to learn how to do it, and you must work constantly every day.

About the demise of the 'international superstar, I think it is not necessarily a demise, more a decline that has allowed for the huge range of music and artists we have never had access to until now.

MATT - You mentioned social media - do you think that the growing availability of music distribution and marketing (Facebook ads, Google AdWords etc) is saturating the market with any old character who fancies a go, or is it a case that because of this ubiquity, artists have to be even more talented and unique than ever before in order to truly compete? 

FRANK - I think that the market is definitely saturated with campaigns of all types and unfortunately often these are fake campaigns. Basically, it is a big chaos.

Anyone who has a blog or some social network with a relatively large number of followers suddenly becomes a promoter asking for money from the already frustrated and harassed new artists trying to emerge. But one thing is certain… 

If you do not have something to say artistically, you can do all the campaigns you want, but you will not go anywhere. 

Of course, compared to before, interacting with large numbers of people, you can cater to a niche which is certainly a better result than you could have done before.

MATT - I want to talk a bit about your musical direction. Dance music and psychedelic rock aren't genres you typically find together. What was your motivation behind 'Blackout', and what made you choose to marry these rather disparate styles? Do you have plans to explore more of these types of fusion, and if so, what can we expect from you in the future?

FRANK - I chose to combine these two genres because I think (and it is not just me that thinks this), that rock music and dance music are the two main genres that are capable of moving millions of people.

Look at the impact of rock music festivals like ‘Woodstock’ and ‘Isle of Wight Music Festival’ in the 1970s with huge turnouts. Today rock is still just as relevant, with great musical events like ‘Rock in Rio’, ‘Exit’, and ‘Roskilde.’

MATT - What's your creative process like? What's a typical studio session like for you - do you start with your beats and move onto melodies, or are you in there with your guitar above all else, and the rest follows later?

FRANK - It is not always the same, it depends on a lot of factors. If it is a dance song, I might start with the beat, the groove, the bass, and then add on from there. If it is a soundtrack, I might start with a violin and then expand on the arrangement. The list of variations can go on, especially if you're collaborating with other artists.

MATT - Do you get hit with a song idea whilst you're gardening or driving, or is it more a case of just getting in the studio and making a mess until something amazing happens?

FRANK - Both. But I am also often inspired by things I listen to that move me.

MATT - How long does it take you to take a track from an idea to a finished product?

FRANK - This depends on the complexity of the song and its needs - how many tracks a song is made of, the quality of the tracks (especially if you are working for third parties), etc. If the tracks of the song are few, of excellent quality and there are voices sung well with their emotional strength, with few effects and automation, then it will surely be a simpler and faster job.

I can have the finished product in three days, or a week, a month or more.

MATT - Do you ever struggle with writer's block, or that horrible feeling of perfectionism we get where no matter what we do, nothing sounds 'right'? What do you do to recalibrate yourself in these situations? What would your advice to other creatives be when they're facing a similar conundrum? 

FRANK - Oh Matt, this a terrible question because it happens to me very often! It happens often because when I work I always want to do better, better and better.

My solution?

If it's my song (it's not a job for third parties), I just stop working on it and I do something else. Then I re-open it again after some time has passed and I try again.

MATT - The holy grail for any independent artist these days seems to be the coveted playlist placement. What do you think it is about playlists that makes them so different from more traditional forms of mass exposure, and what role do you think the playlist curator plays in introducing emerging artists to the fanbases they desire?

FRANK - I think that playlists are becoming more and more important for independent artists because they have potential to provide considerable limelight and according to their real popularity, gives the opportunity to be more visible and have economic gains. This is a motivation.

Another important motivation for the artists, is that they can check out almost in real time through their accounts what the state of their audience is, helping them to make decisions on what they need to do, which song needs to be pushed, and which doesn't do well at all.

About the curators, I think that they are very important and have a responsibility that when they ask for money to be honest and realistic about what is to be expected.

You cannot ask $200 for including a song in your playlist for a month if potentially the artist gets an overall of $50 or $100 back. I know that it is not simple to calculate the potential gain, but you have to be honest and try to do your best in order to have a fair exchange. 

MATT - Is there a worry that in a lot of cases, the freedom of diversity that we've lauded as the byproduct of the streaming age will be lost as the curators with the real power influence the way people write their music in order to make it 'playlist friendly'?

FRANK - I think that somehow people, including myself a few years ago, can be heavily influenced by the musical market and allow it to influence changes in their musical direction, losing originality in compositions and the pleasure of doing what they really feel in their heart.

Today most of the people don’t create music anymore using their heart, they want to just earn money. It’s sad but true. 

MATT - So what should an artist who doesn't fit the mold do to combat this situation?

FRANK - I think that there are three ways to do music today - it’s all about the personal choice.

An artist can choose to be original (without any commercial contamination).

The second way (and this is what I usually do), is try to have a mediation.

When I produce music, especially when it's something current such as pop music, I only take elements like powerful drums, bass sounds of a certain kind and mix them with what is part of my musical baggage and my personal point of view. Basically, I refuse to copy the sounds that are already out there. 

The third way, of course, is to make copies of copies of things that have already been done. As for this third way, I do not say it's wrong but I personally don’t like doing that.

MATT - Finally, tell me a unique fact about your track 'Blackout'. It could be an interesting anecdote from the studio, a creative accident that radically altered the course of the track for the better (or for worse), or something meaningful about the story behind it.

FRANK - The particular thing I can say about the creation of Blackout, is that the production was borne of a Skype video call between me in New York, Lino Di Meglio in Naples, and Oscar Junior in Mallorca. And the guitar that I used that day had only three strings.

Yes, I should have put new strings on, but to not ruin the atmosphere that was being created, I recorded everything on the spot despite the absence of the remaining three strings.

You can learn more about Frank Iengo here:


Music to Save The World

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Evil Twist – TYCKO

4 September 2018

Music to Save The World
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September has arrived, and with it comes a brand new featured track - this month is all about 'Evil Twist' from Belgian duo TYCKO! 

It takes a true Save the World! track to make the top spot on my list, and I think it's safe to say that Evil Twist is just that. It's dark textures layered across a deep house landscape paint a vivid picture of a very tangible, very human experience, filled with tension, anticipation, exhilaration, and most importantly, hopefulness. The amount of work that went into its creation is apparent in every beat and measure, as we're transported to the forefront of a blossoming romance - and all the confusion that comes with it.

For me, this kind of consideration is crucial when it comes to telling a compelling story through music. Unlike so many tracks meandering across our airwaves at the moment, TYCKO have paid meticulous attention to ensuring that everything from the haunting piano melody to the ethereal reverbs work together with the vocals to tell a cohesive story. It's always a shame for me when elements in an otherwise brilliant composition seem to argue with and contradict each other. When everything works together to paint a vivid picture, gems like this one emerge effortlessly.

Telling a cohesive story is only half the battle though. That story also has to be real and honest, in that it faithfully depicts some meaningful aspect of the human experience. It's almost too easy to go for the low-hanging fruit when it comes to the subject of a new relationship, discussing the obvious exhilaration and passion that accompanies the experience. Where 'Evil Twist' once again pushes the boundaries is in the boldness with which it explores the more uncomfortable and troubling elements that invariably accompany the heady emotions of a fresh romance. 

It's this kind of raw honesty in story-telling that can TRULY save somebody's world; often the most heroic voice isn't the one that shouts the loudest or promises the universe, but the one that echoes a sentiment, normalises a fear, and ultimately understands the situation. It's rare we turn to music to fix or remedy. Instead, its utility lies in deepening our understanding of a situation or experience, providing insight into our mysterious internal workings, and ultimately providing some kind of catharsis that enables us to approach our obstacles with focus and clarity. Evil Twist does all of this without ever feeling forced or overly self-aware, which is testament to its level of sophistication both musically and lyrically. 

I promised you all some quality house music was coming, and I'd like to think that I've delivered on that promise. Make sure you leave a comment and let us know what you think of September's track of the month!


Himalaya by Ellipsis

The Music to Save The World playlist is sponsored this month by Himalaya from Ellipsis.

The journey begins - fresh Chillstep from Ellipsis to help you focus. Stream it now:


Follow us on social:

You can learn more about TYCKO here:


About the curator - Matt Jenko

Matt Jenko is a university postgraduate and music producer with an unhealthy obsession with Rick & Morty and all things Game of Thrones. When he’s not in the studio (a rare occurrence these days), he’s fueling his passion for music either on the net or out in the real world. He likes being out in the nature (in the least strenuous capacity though, let’s be real here) and chilling with his cat, and he’s also pretty proud of his mammoth collection of books that he’s never read.

Checkout Matt's project Ellipsis on Spotify and Facebook

Parade – Vinai

29 August 2018

Music to Save The World
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This week's entry is short and sweet as we gear up for something special coming into September, but don't let the brevity fool you - this track will blow your socks clean off! 

When your day is difficult to navigate (especially coming out of the luxury of a three-day weekend), 'Parade' is a much-needed injection of motivation. It's fast-paced, hits hard, and bounces between vibes with no real regard for the confines of genre. It's one I find myself having to play again once it's finished because one hit isn't enough, and by the end of it, everything suddenly seems manageable again. 

If the obstacles you're facing feel insurmountable at the moment, give 'Parade' a hearty blast and see if it doesn't leave you with a bloody big smile on your face!


Clarity by Ellipsis

The Music to Save The World playlist is sponsored this month by Himalaya from Ellipsis.

The journey begins - fresh Chillstep from Ellipsis to help you focus. Stream it now:


Follow us on social:

You can learn more about Vinai here:


About the curator - Matt Jenko

Matt Jenko is a university postgraduate and music producer with an unhealthy obsession with Rick & Morty and all things Game of Thrones. When he’s not in the studio (a rare occurrence these days), he’s fueling his passion for music either on the net or out in the real world. He likes being out in the nature (in the least strenuous capacity though, let’s be real here) and chilling with his cat, and he’s also pretty proud of his mammoth collection of books that he’s never read.

Checkout Matt's project Ellipsis on Spotify and Facebook

Reawakening – The Foxfires

22 August 2018

Music to Save The World
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I've been making music for half my life. 

Before I was a dance music producer, I was in a rock n roll band AND a new wave band; before that, I was dabbling with heavy metal, and I also spent a good year or two composing my own concept album with a proper story and everything. 

My first band however, was a punk band. From the age of fourteen til almost nineteen, I played in a couple of different punk outfits (the second, Hummer, is still going, and if you like gritty punk then I highly recommend you check them out). But my musical tastes have always been in flux, and as time went by I became far more interested in indie bands like Arctic Monkeys, Foals, The Wombats... Basically anything to do with animals it seems. Is it any wonder then that when The Foxfires landed in my inbox my musical nostalgic interest was instantly peaked? 

To be honest with you, my initial response was 'this isn't for me', simply because I've always had a pretty solid idea of how my list should sound and the kinds of songs I'll accept on it - you'll notice I'm mostly dance and electronica-oriented on here, and the only hint at indie (from my personal entries at least) so far has been 'Bow' by Kasabian. But there was something about this band that made me want to delve deeper, explore their sound a little more, because I genuinely wanted to find something from them that would vibe well with my list. 

And find it I did! The eponymous track from their 2016 album 'Reawakening' was everything the Matt from ten years ago would have wanted in an indie track: it's uplifting, it's got pretty little melodies running throughout, and Christian's voice has a tone I can only describe as 'friendly' - listening to a Foxfires song is like listening to your best pal talk; it's familiar, it's reassuring. What really stood out for me though was the drumming. Not because it's particularly flash (that'd sound out of place in this kind of genre, and I've seen so many good indie bands shoot themselves in the foot because their drummer thought he was the next Portnoy), but because this is exactly the style of drumming I was trying to bring to the bands I was playing in in the late 2000s - much to the annoyance of my punk-minded band mates... 

The best thing about this song though is how unpredictable it is. It starts off with this nice and casual intro, with lazy Sunday vibes, the kind you'd walk your dog along the beach to. When we hit the chorus, your ear says to you, 'yep, I heard this coming, this is the logical progression for a song of this calibre, I absolutely knew this would... wait hang on a minute, what's happening now?!', as the second half of the chorus comes storming in with four on the floor, Queens of the Stone Age-style beats and everything opens up - I can only imagine how a crowd would react to this in a live scenario! 

This is the kind of music I really look for for Saving the World! to - stuff that catches you off guard, takes listening to another level, and emulates some aspect of the human experience. Sonically, 'Reawakening' is a perfect emulation of how we can often be taking a casual, lazy Sunday approach to living our lives, when all of sudden something sparks that sense of adventure, gives us a kick up the arse, and pushes us to heights we didn't think possible. We all need a little reawakening in our lives from time to time, because it's so easy to end up in a rut, and if this song doesn't help to push you to get out and do something a little bit funky today then I don't think there's a song on this list that will! 

The suckers for continuity amongst you will hasten to point out that last week I promised a lot more house music, and then this week threw out an indie curveball. To that I say, a good hero never plays by the rules, and I like to keep you on your toes (seriously though, there will be a lot more house music to come I promise).

Enjoy this week's entry (possibly the most I've written so far, Andrew? (Editor's note: Probably ;-p)), and if you're not typically an indie fan, maybe, just maybe, this will be the track to convert you to the cool side of the force!


Clarity by Ellipsis

The Music to Save The World playlist is sponsored this month by Himalaya from Ellipsis.

The journey begins - fresh Chillstep from Ellipsis to help you focus. Stream it now:


Follow us on social:

You can learn more about The Foxfires here:


About the curator - Matt Jenko

Matt Jenko is a university postgraduate and music producer with an unhealthy obsession with Rick & Morty and all things Game of Thrones. When he’s not in the studio (a rare occurrence these days), he’s fueling his passion for music either on the net or out in the real world. He likes being out in the nature (in the least strenuous capacity though, let’s be real here) and chilling with his cat, and he’s also pretty proud of his mammoth collection of books that he’s never read.

Checkout Matt's project Ellipsis on Spotify and Facebook

Body – Loud Luxury

14 August 2018

Music to Save The World
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Taking some time away from my list, and reading the things that Andrew was writing for Save the World, has put it back into perspective for me what this is all about for me. I started out with the idea that this list would be about the everyday struggles that come from being a human, and providing a soundtrack to those struggles to help you overcome them. The list began as 'Music to Save the World to', with emphasis there on the 'to'; it was music to listen to whilst you went about being a hero in your own personal world, as opposed to music aimed at fixing the ills of society in general.

Over time we've moved more into the realm of the heroic as we explored the superhero imagery and all the tropes associated with it, but Andrew's time running the list has inspired me to reconnect with the original inspiration behind this list. 

With that, I give you the first track from August 2018: 'Body'.

I don't discover a lot of my favourite songs on the radio. The ones that do get played on the radio, because of the nature of my job as a curator, I've already heard before. Somehow, 'Body' slipped the net. I'd just assumed that this was a brand new track and it was getting mass exposure because it was just so brilliant, but it turns out it's been around almost as long as I've been producing as Ellipsis (ie., since last Autumn [fall for all you 'Muricans]). It was great to hear it getting ridiculous airplay and chart placement so long after it's release because that says to me that this is a song that really resonates with people, has worked it's way up the pecking order and is where it is today because it quite simply deserves to be.

It's not hard to see why. Not only is an incredibly catchy house track (of which you will be hearing many more from this list over the coming weeks), but lyrically it describes a situation we've all been in: when someone you're crushing on seems to be showing an interest only to back it off just at that critical point where something is about to happen, despite the fact that they've perhaps been a little less discriminate in their flirtatious dealings with other members of your social group (note: I had a look at what crew love means, and yeah, that's exactly what's happening in this song). It's a frustrating and often difficult situation to have to deal with, especially if the person in question has been strongly suggesting that they share a common interest with you, which makes this a perfect track to Save the World to - knowing your situation isn't unique to you and that you aren't alone in feeling the way you feel is vital for overcoming a tough ordeal and making it through the other side - to Victory!

It felt right to return to my roots with a house track: house was were we started and will always remain at the core of this list. 

It's good to be back!


Clarity by Ellipsis

The Music to Save The World playlist is sponsored this month by Clarity from Ellipsis.

Enter the Jungle and #FindYourClarity; fresh Chillstep from Ellipsis to help you focus. Stream it now:


Follow us on social:

You can learn more about Loud Luxury here:


About the curator - Matt Jenko

Matt Jenko is a university postgraduate and music producer with an unhealthy obsession with Rick & Morty and all things Game of Thrones. When he’s not in the studio (a rare occurrence these days), he’s fueling his passion for music either on the net or out in the real world. He likes being out in the nature (in the least strenuous capacity though, let’s be real here) and chilling with his cat, and he’s also pretty proud of his mammoth collection of books that he’s never read.

Checkout Matt's project Ellipsis on Spotify and Facebook

Blackout (Radio Edit) – Pynk64

27 June 2018

Music to Save The World
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True heroes don't follow the rules. 

Too often these days, we're tricked into thinking that life follows a paint-by-numbers format, and that if we don't follow this format, we'll find ourselves in trouble. You can see this everywhere you look, and it's a bit worrying to think that sometimes we're falling into the same trap and not even realising it. 

That's why we need tracks like 'Blackout.' Tracks that completely disregard the rules, and instead forge ahead along their own path. Fusing the ethereal licks and guitar stabs from 70s psychedelic rock with the driving groove of contemporary house music, Blackout serves a refreshing hit that disregards genre and takes the listener on an incredible auditory journey. One of the most exciting aspects of the track for me is the beautiful arpeggio swimming throughout, exotic and mysterious, and placed in that ambient sweet-spot within the mix so as to be noticeable without being overpowering. 

There's so much to be admired in this visionary work, and I find myself noticing something new on each listen. Tracks like this reward the repeat listener with these little subtleties, and are what makes a great song stand out from those that are merely good. If you want my advice, the best way to enjoy this track is by giving it your full attention; that means on loop and through headphones, and I guarantee you'll be guided to some incredible places. For bonus points, listen to the extended edit (which can be found on Frank's artist profile on Spotify), and take the unabridged journey. 

Tracks like this, that are layered with deep ambience and virtuosic musicianship, are rare finds in a world where music has so many rules that need to be obeyed. Don't follow the crowd. Explore unknown musical vistas, and discover the music that's truly worth listening to. 


Clarity by Ellipsis

The Music to Save The World playlist is sponsored this month by Clarity from Ellipsis.

Enter the Jungle and #FindYourClarity; fresh Chillstep from Ellipsis to help you focus. Stream it now:


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You can learn more about Pynk64 here:


About the curator - Matt Jenko

Matt Jenko is a university postgraduate and music producer with an unhealthy obsession with Rick & Morty and all things Game of Thrones. When he’s not in the studio (a rare occurrence these days), he’s fueling his passion for music either on the net or out in the real world. He likes being out in the nature (in the least strenuous capacity though, let’s be real here) and chilling with his cat, and he’s also pretty proud of his mammoth collection of books that he’s never read.

Checkout Matt's project Ellipsis on Spotify and Facebook

7 Years of Bad Luck – Mario Dones

12 June 2018

Music to Save The World
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You all know how much I love music that has real atmosphere and tells a story. I especially love it when that story is motivating and uplifting, even when life's been kicking you in the shins a bit. 

Mario Dones' 7 Years of Bad Luck, despite what the title might make you think, is exactly that type of track. Cast across a vast pizzicato landscape punctuated with deep 808 valleys, 7 Years is a flawlessly articulated tale of pulling yourself out of the deep and conquering the world. Mario shifts effortlessly from abrasive defiance to rapid-fire introspective flow, all the time contemplating old attitudes and the consequences of his actions. 

It's a lesson in being humble and honest, and being willing to concede that we aren't always in the right. What really resonated with me is when Mario discusses battling with creative jealousy, especially when it seems like the people around us are finding more success than we are. I actually discussed this myself in a recent interview on the main Music to Facebook page, and like Mario, I've found that the best way to overcome it is to simply stop worrying about what everyone else is up to and focus on your own goals. You'd be surprised by how many people are secretly envious of some of the things you aren't even aware you've achieved. 

Ultimately, Mario gets what I'm about, and what the whole point of my playlist is. In his own words, 7 Years is "not a sad song. It's more so a about overcoming your personal obstacles and pulling yourself up... Saving your own world." This is so important. Stop worrying about other peoples' worlds, and start saving your own. Do that, and everything else will fall into place. 


Clarity by Ellipsis

The Music to Save The World playlist is sponsored this month by Clarity from Ellipsis.

Enter the Jungle and #FindYourClarity; fresh Chillstep from Ellipsis to help you focus. Stream it now:


Follow us on social:

You can learn more about Mario Dones here:


About the curator - Matt Jenko

Matt Jenko is a university postgraduate and music producer with an unhealthy obsession with Rick & Morty and all things Game of Thrones. When he’s not in the studio (a rare occurrence these days), he’s fueling his passion for music either on the net or out in the real world. He likes being out in the nature (in the least strenuous capacity though, let’s be real here) and chilling with his cat, and he’s also pretty proud of his mammoth collection of books that he’s never read.

Checkout Matt's project Ellipsis on Spotify and Facebook

Skip a Beat – Second Floor Rumour

29 May 2018

Music to Save The World
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Seeing as how May seems to have completely fallen out from underneath our feet and the hot weather we've been having in the UK hints at the chance of an actual summer, it seems only right to include what may very well become the soundtrack to your 2018. 

'Skip a Beat' is the quintessential tropical anthem. The product of powerhouse duo Greg and Alex, aka Second Floor Rumour, everything from the subtle Caribbean percussion to the beautiful melodic lead pluck paints a steamy picture of watching the sun drop behind the ocean before slipping off across the sand to Save the World! of that special someone... 

I think anyone who's been working hard over the past few months, especially those of you who've had exams and assignments to conquer, owes themselves a bit of time to celebrate, and what better track to commemorate your Victory! than this exotic masterpiece? 

Have a drink on me team x 


Clarity by Ellipsis

The Music to Save The World playlist is sponsored this month by Clarity from Ellipsis.

Enter the Jungle and #FindYourClarity; fresh Chillstep from Ellipsis to help you focus. Stream it now:


Follow us on social:

You can learn more about Second Floor Rumour here:


About the curator - Matt Jenko

Matt Jenko is a university postgraduate and music producer with an unhealthy obsession with Rick & Morty and all things Game of Thrones. When he’s not in the studio (a rare occurrence these days), he’s fueling his passion for music either on the net or out in the real world. He likes being out in the nature (in the least strenuous capacity though, let’s be real here) and chilling with his cat, and he’s also pretty proud of his mammoth collection of books that he’s never read.

Checkout Matt's project Ellipsis on Spotify and Facebook

Beyond the Sun – Imagined Herbal Flows

22 May 2018

Music to Save The World
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I've had enough of trying to Save the World! this week. I mean, I've been putting in some serious hours in this silly little thing we call life, and now I'm ready for some maximum chill time. 

Beyond the Sun is the embodiment of chilled-out flow. It's the kind of track you can just put on repeat, close your eyes, and properly relax. I don't mean when you crash on the couch when you get home from work or let yourself have an extra hour in bed on a Sunday. Y'know, where you still haven't really switched off, and the baggage from the previous day or the anticipation of tomorrow lingers and looms. 

This track is true chill material: the kind that transports you from day-to-day drudgery into twisting kaleidoscopic astroscapes (not sure if that's a word but I like it and might call my next album that, who knows); the kind of track that reminds you that there's more to life than spreadsheets and financial projections, that perhaps there's more out there in that big ol' universe than neighbourhood politics and who can grow the greenest grass (it's definitely not Graham from Number 29, and he's kidding himself and his sandals if he thinks otherwise...)

Do yourself a favour. Lie down, have a minute, and give this track a spin. See if you don't feel the weight of obligation lift, even for just a brief moment. 


Clarity by Ellipsis

The Music to Save The World playlist is sponsored this month by Clarity from Ellipsis.

Enter the Jungle and #FindYourClarity; fresh Chillstep from Ellipsis to help you focus. Stream it now:


Follow us on social:

You can learn more about Imagined Herbal Flows here:


About the curator - Matt Jenko

Matt Jenko is a university postgraduate and music producer with an unhealthy obsession with Rick & Morty and all things Game of Thrones. When he’s not in the studio (a rare occurrence these days), he’s fueling his passion for music either on the net or out in the real world. He likes being out in the nature (in the least strenuous capacity though, let’s be real here) and chilling with his cat, and he’s also pretty proud of his mammoth collection of books that he’s never read.

Checkout Matt's project Ellipsis on Spotify and Facebook