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Music to Dali & Jay-Z Lovers
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You know those paintings people look at and just think: "This guy was just playing with colors and threw some random ones and called it art"? Well, only the painters themselves can say if that's true or if they really had a purpose by putting those colors togethers. In most cases, the latter is true.

The same happens with rap. The power of words is highlighted in rap like in no other genre, but sometimes we might just listen and think: "What? What does that verse even mean?", and we might some real interesting stuff.

This track, for example, is a pure, delightful sample of one individual orgasming in his own badassness by playing with words, rhymes and figures. The individual, in this case, is Qwel, member of Chicago underground hip hop group Typical Cats. 

By spitting his "Qweloquiallisms" over a jazzy piano and echoed drums, Qwel constantly reaffirms his ability to dismantle his opponents by using a clever choice of words, powered by his intensity.

I won't go too deep into his metaphors because even I can be wrong about their meaning, but I particularly love how he challenges the opponent/listener with "Three guesses, who the best is?" and starts the craziest wordplay ("Check it, check it / Hello, hello / Yo, yo / I am, I ams / Dumb, dumb" - which is later explained: "I see words, split 'em in twice with reverbs / Become a believer") and later says "I won like three thirds", claiming he's the one, that's so genius.

All songs by this group are filled by fat metrics and an avalanche of verses; but this track in particular has some of the most interesting - and not typical at all - lyrics of these Cats.


You can learn more about Typical Cats here:

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About the curator: Ana Clara Ribeiro 

 Ana Clara Ribeiro - Musicto Curator

Music, art and entertainment have always played a big role in the life of Ana Clara Ribeiro. She grew up in Gurupi (an inland city in Tocantins, the youngest State of Brazil), listening to all kinds of music, reading, writing, watching stuff and connecting them to her personal beliefs and other ideas she read about.

As she became a lawyer and a writer, all the topics to which she is constantly exposed continued to give her insights about life, people and the universe, through the lenses of art.

Nowadays, when she isn’t analyzing lawsuits or producing content about Law, Marketing, Business or Music, she is certainly doing something related to her various personal and professional projects, always to the sound of a playlist as eclectic as her life.

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